Category Archives: Labour costs

Blogs in this category will analyse trends in labour costs published by various statistical agencies

Now people pay to work for free

I am back on my regular pattern which means there will be no detailed Wednesday blog – just some snippets if anything. This morning, I did a radio interview on the national broadcaster (ABC) about the growing spread of unpaid … Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Labour costs, Music | 15 Comments

Welcome to the ‘homeless’ working poor – a new neoliberal KPI

In advanced nations, poverty used to be a thing of old age, once income had stopped due to retirement and savings depleted. Old-aged pension systems were intended as Welfare States emerged to prevent that fall into poverty. The pension systems … Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Future of Work, Labour costs | 11 Comments

Employers lying about the flat wages growth in Australia

Last Friday (February 8, 2018), the Reserve Bank of Australia issued its latest – Statement on Monetary Policy – February 2018 – which in its own words “sets out the Bank’s assessment of current economic conditions, both domestic and international, … Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Labour costs, RBA decisions, Reclaim the State | 2 Comments

Australian real wages growth flat – the ripoff of workers continues

Today (November 15, 2017), the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) released the – Wage Price Index, Australia – for the September-quarter 2017. Private sector wages growth was marginally higher in the September-quarter at 1.86 per cent (annualised) after six consecutive … Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Labour costs | 3 Comments

Retail sales dive in Australia – neoliberal contradictions now obvious

This neoliberal era has a habit of getting ahead of itself and exposing its internal contradictions. In fact, the Capitalist system, as Marx, Keynes and others have demonstrated, it inherently inconsistent. The imposition of neoliberalism has only heightened those inconsistencies … Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Economics, Labour costs | 5 Comments

Australia – real wages growth zero and the rip-off of workers continues

When the Australian Bureau of Statistics released its latest wages data in May (for the March quarter) we learned that real wages were falling as a result of nominal wages failing to keep pace with the modest inflation rate. Today … Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Labour costs | 18 Comments

Australian government employment plan – racist and in breach of our laws

Today’s discussion is about how employment policy becomes so corrupted by neo-liberal ideology (overlaid with some healthy racism) that the government causes damage rather than advances well-being. The examples I outline demonstrate the wider problem that neo-liberal inspired governments clearly … Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Job Guarantee, Labour costs, Labour Force | 5 Comments

British employers exhibit on-going greed but lie about it

One of the abiding and recurring trends, accentuated in the neo-liberal era, is the apparent ‘concern’ for the low-paid by the captains of industry. They continually warn against allowing pay increases for this cohort because they are – so the … Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Britain, Labour costs, UK Economy | 15 Comments

Disturbing pay trends in Britain

Earlier this month (July 3, 2017) the British Office of National Statistics (ONS) released a research report – Wage growth in Pay Review Body Occupations – which basically summarises what has gone wrong with the world under neo-liberalism. While the … Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Britain, Labour costs, UK Economy | 11 Comments

When the top-end-of-town realise their strategy is failing

There was an interesting article in the Financial Times on Monday (June 26, 2017) – Why US big business is listening to Bernie Sanders – which, despite the somewhat misleading and over-the-top headline, tells us a little of the way … Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Economics, Labour costs | 32 Comments