Category Archives: Fiscal Statements

Operationalising core MMT principles – Part 1

Things seem to come in cycles. We have been at this for some years now – trying to articulate the principles of Modern Monetary Theory (MMT) in various ways in various fora. There is now a solid academic literature – … Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Debriefing 101, Fiscal Statements, Inflation, Job Guarantee | 1 Comment

EU deliberately subjugates prosperity to maintain its neoliberal ideology

While the Brexit shambles wound on in London, with the Prime Minister being walloped one day by her own party, and then the next given a victory, courtesy of some Labour Party bungling (the no-confidence motion), across the Channel things … Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Eurozone, Fiscal Statements | 37 Comments

There is no internal MMT rift on trade or development

I was going to write about Jamaica today but this topic emerged that I thought I should deal with before I write about the home of reggae. In fact, some of the material is input into a reasoned discussion about … Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Capital controls, Economics, Fiscal Statements, Framing and Language, IMF | 35 Comments

The Australian Labor Party is still stuck in its neoliberal denial stage

Yesterday, the Federal government released their so-called – Mid-Year Economic and Fiscal Outlook (MYEFO) – which is their half-yearly review of the fiscal policy settings. Unsurprisingly, the Treasurer was crowing about the shift towards surplus with booming company tax revenue. … Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Fiscal Statements, Politics | 13 Comments

Australian workers losing out under neoliberalism

The current conflict in France, while multidimensional, is a reflection that the neoliberal austerity system is not working for ordinary people. All sorts of cross currents feed in to this discontent, some of which (for example, distaste for foreigners/migrants) are … Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Admin, Economics, Fiscal Statements, National Accounts | 12 Comments

Greek austerity – a denial of basic human rights, penalty should be imprisonment

I have just finished reading a report published by the Transnational Institute (TNI), which is an “international research and advocacy institute committed to building a just, democratic and sustainable world”. The Report (published November 19, 2018) – Democracy Not For … Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Eurozone, Fiscal Statements, Framing and Language, IMF | 48 Comments

Britain should reject the Brexit ‘agreement’ but proceed with the exit

It is Wednesday, and only a short blog post beckons today. I have restrained myself from commenting on Theresa May’s unbelievable Brexit deal, which has the dirty paws of the European Commission all over it. Regular readers will know that … Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Britain, Capital controls, Demise of the Left, Fiscal Statements, Framing and Language, Politics, Reclaim the State, UK Economy | 24 Comments

The ‘fiscal contraction expansion’ lie lives on – now playing in Italy – Part 2

This is the second and final part in my discussion about the latest attempts by the IMF and notable New Keynesian macroeconomists to keep the ‘fiscal contraction expansion’ lie alive. The crisis in Italy is once again giving these characters … Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Central banking, Eurozone, Fiscal Statements | 9 Comments

The ‘fiscal contraction expansion’ lie lives on – now playing in Italy – Part 1

Pathetic was the first word that came to mind when I read this article – The Italian Budget: A Case of Contractionary Fiscal Expansion? – written by Olivier Blanchard and Jeromin Zettlemeyer, from the Peter Peterson Institute for International Economics. … Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Eurozone, Fiscal Statements, IMF | 15 Comments

Eurozone fiscal rules bias nations to stagnation – exit is the remedy

It is Wednesday and I am doing the final corrections to our Macroeconomics textbook manuscript before it goes off to the ‘printers’ for publication in March 2019. It has been a long haul and I can say that writing a … Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Central banking, Eurozone, Fiscal Statements | 26 Comments