The Weekend Quiz – June 17-18, 2017

Welcome to The Weekend Quiz, which used to be known as the Saturday Quiz! The quiz tests whether you have been paying attention or not to the blogs I post. See how you go with the following questions. Your results are only known to you and no records are retained.

1. National income would rise each year even if the workers were engaged by government to dig large holes and fill them in again on a daily basis.



2. Which fiscal position outcome is the least expansionary?





3. If the government reduces its net spending by say $10 billion, the net financial assets destroyed by this fiscal withdrawal could be replaced by the central bank engaging in a $10 billion quantitative easing program.





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    5 Responses to The Weekend Quiz – June 17-18, 2017

    1. Mark Kinnear says:

      2 from 3
      Q1 2 misread … thought 1% was too obvious

    2. Nigel Hargreaves says:

      Mark,

      You’ve given away the answer now. But I got that one wrong for the same reason. Other two also right.

    3. Murph says:

      My first 3 – 3 in a couple weeks!

    4. Dallas Lewis says:

      I got them all right but your scoring mechanism insists I got 2 out of 3. This has been a problem for some time. Can you have this looked at please Bill?

    5. bill says:

      Dear Dallas Lewis (at 2017/06/17 at 9:47 pm)

      I have never seen the problem. I check it each time. I also just redid the quiz myself and the answers generated are correct and consistent with my entries.

      If you are claiming you have the right answers then the quiz would acknowledge that.

      Please send me a screenshot to support your claim and I will investigate further.

      best wishes
      bill

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